Culture

Here you will find all the content related to the category 'culture'.

Mary Hilson is Professor of History at Aarhus University and Peter Stadius is Research Director at the Centre for Nordic Studies at Helsinki University.

2021.07.01 | Podcast, Mary Hilson, Peter Stadius, Research, Culture, Aarhus University, University of Helsinki

Uncovering the Nordic Region with Mary Hilson and Peter Stadius

Hot topics in current academic research on the Nordic region include welfare, colonialism and heterogeneity. These – as well as a host of other issues - have been the main themes of the podcast series ‘The Nordics Uncovered: Critical Voices from the Region’ and form the subject of this podcast. In the final podcast of the series, editor of…

Gustav Wentzel's painting "Emigrants" from 1903, an iconic depiction of Norwegian emigration. (Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons).

2021.06.09 | The Quick Read, Jan Eivind Myhre, Culture, The Borders of the Nordics, University of Oslo

Population movement to and within Norway, 1830-1914

From the 1830s to the 1920s about 800,000 Norwegians emigrated, mostly to America. There is less general awareness of the fact that between 100,000 and 200,000 people immigrated to Norway during the second half of the 19th century. The migrants came largely from Sweden, but also from other parts of Europe. Moreover, the population was on the move…

The Danish flag, the Dannebrog, is often perceived as being important to Danish culture. Photo: Colourbox.

2021.04.23 | The Quick Read, Pirzada Junaid Ahmad, Culture

The Dannebrog in Danish culture

Denmark exhibits a unique culture where the national flag, known by its local name 'Dannebrog', has become an everyday symbol used by Danes. In addition to official functions and ceremonies, Danes use their national flag for birthday parties, graduation ceremonies, advertisements and decorations, among many other occasions. Although personal use…

Should racist depictions in children's literature be erased? Is erasure an important part of rewriting history and trying to right historic wrongs, or will it lead to a sanitisation and neglect of important aspects of our past? Photo: Colourbox.

2020.12.17 | Article, Vibeke Sofie Sandager Rønnedal, Culture, Minorities, Aarhus University

Racism in classic pieces of Nordic children's literature

Some of the most beloved figures in Nordic children’s literary classics from the 20th century are rooted in narrow-minded caricatures, and racial prejudice can be so subtly embedded in many older pieces of literature that even contemporary readers are blinded to it. The discussion surrounding the republishing of some of these controversial books…

History can be many things. Even the most well-established works of history are written with a certain focus, disregarding some narratives while highlighting others. The same goes for TV productions, museum exhibitions, and all the many other ways in which history is used. Photo: Colourbox.

2020.12.10 | Outlook, Niels Kayser Nielsen, Media, Culture, Aarhus University

Uses of Nordic history

The 'use of history' is the term used to denote a combination of selecting, emphasising and overlooking people, events and epochs taken from history. These aspects are to be found in the pool of historical knowledge that we share and are usually identified with the intention of promoting certain interests. In the Nordics, as elsewhere, these…

Members of the armed forces on exercise in Sweden. Photo: Johannes Jansson, norden.org, CC BY-NC-SA 4.0

2020.09.01 | Article, Beate Sløk Andersen, Gender, Culture, Education, Copenhagen Business School

Humor in the military professions: a case study on exclusion in the Nordics

In principle, all levels of the male-dominated professions in the Nordic countries are accessible to men and women alike. But, informal processes of exclusion may interfere with gender integration; an extensive use of humor can, for example, interfere with women’s attempts to become part of the military profession. While military organizations are…

J. R. R. Tolkien drew on Nordic folklore in his work, having a profound impact on how people imagine dwarves, elves and so on, the visual and vocal representations of which have been supplemented by  Hollywood productions. Photo: Perrie Nicholas Smith (Gimli Son of Gloin, CC BY-SA 4.0).

2020.03.24 | Article, Frog, Culture, Reputation

Folklore in the Nordic countries

Folklore is a phenomenon found in all cultures. Falling under the umbrella of what is now called ‘intangible cultural heritage’ by UNESCO, it encompasses everything from Finnish improvisational rap and medieval eddic poetry to internet memes or wearing a crown of candles on St Lucia’s day. Nordic folklore research has played a significant role in…

In the 1960s, commentators suggested the behavior of Scandinavian mothers, such as dominating child-rearing and going out to work, influenced their offspring's mental health and led to higher suicide rates. Photo: Les Anderson, Unsplash.

2019.11.28 | Outlook, Byron Zachary Rom-Jensen, Reputation, Culture, Research, Aarhus University

‘Socialist’ suicide in Scandinavia: a historical view of a common myth

High rates of suicide are often connected with the Nordic countries and their apparently ‘socialist’ policies. Highlighting high suicide rates in Scandinavia can be traced back to at least the 1960s when foreign observers attempted to either undermine or legitimize the welfare states in Denmark, Norway and Sweden. These characterizations forced…

National symbols vary widely and are often contested. Some of them - such as the social concept of Danish 'hygge' often symbolised by a candle - have been marketed successfully abroad in recent years.

2019.07.09 | The Quick Read, Thomas Hylland Eriksen, Culture, University of Oslo

National symbols in the Nordic countries

National symbols share an ability to fuse diverse people in a shared feeling of identity. They are as diverse as flags to food, scenery to famous people, and they vary depending on whether they are viewed from inside or outside the Nordics or a specific country. A pressing question today is which national symbols are appropriate for globalised,…

"the greatest enemy of children’s culture is that which is authoritarian and uninspiring" (from principles put together in 1969 at a symposium hosted by the Nordic Council of Ministers in 1969). Photo: Unsplash.

2019.06.03 | Article, Helle Strandgaard Jensen, Culture, Media, Research, Aarhus University

How to raise your parents: Scandinavian children’s television in 1970s

Children’s departments in Scandinavian broadcasting corporations (in Denmark, Norway and Sweden) were clearly influenced by the call for equality and the influence of principles arising from the 1968 movement. Producers of children’s programmes worked extensively to democratise children’s television by, for example, taking children’s wishes and…

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