Multiculturalism and globalisation:

Multiculturalism and globalisation

Articles on this page intend to address not only how researchers approach and understand issues such as multiculturalism, diversity, mobility, Europeanisation and globalisation, but also how Norden interacts and is seen by the wider world. This include the categories minorities, belief systems and the arts. Globalisation is interpreted widely. New articles are added regularly.


Guest workers striking against forced redundancies in front of DA (the Danish Employers' Association), 1978. Photo: Arbejdermuseets Arkiv (The Workers Museum's Archive).

2019.11.07 | Article, Niels Wium Olesen, Astrid Elkjær Sørensen, Thorsten Borring Olesen, Rosanna Farbøl, Labour markets, Minorities, Aarhus University

Danish immigration policy, 1970-1992

In 1973, the Social Democrat government introduced an immediate stop to labour immigration because of growing unemployment. Immigration was, however, not a particularly problematic subject in the political and public debate in the 1970s. From the beginning of the 1980s, more refugees came to Denmark, particularly from the Middle East and the…

This volume was a result of the first seminar on Sámi literature in 1972 where many Sámi authors published their first text. The premise was that one language could not live through another language. Čállagat means 'Written Works'. Photo: Author.

2019.10.01 | Article, Lill Tove Fredriksen, Literature, Minorities

A brief history of Sámi literature

Sámi literature's history can be traced from the 1600s and the course of this history can be interpreted in the context of important Sámi, national and international political movements. Sámi literature is literature written by authors who are Sámi, who are members of the Sámi people. In this short article, the Sámi socio-political development…

Danes arriving in Flensburg from Copenhagen and elsewhere for the 1920 vote on whether the Middle Schleswig zone should be Danish or German.

2019.06.12 | Film, Nation building, Minorities, Aarhus University

Drawing the German-Danish border: the vote in Flensburg, 1920

Go to Flensborg, Germany, in 1920 and see firsthand what it was like during the plebiscite on 14th March. Would Flensborg and central Schleswig remain German or become a new part of Denmark? Klaus Tolstrup Petersen, historian and director of the Schleswig Collection (Danish Central Library for South Schleswig), explains in Danish with English…

Poster from 1920. Picture: Drawn by Rasmus Christiansen.  Rigsarkivet (CC BY-SA 2.0).

2019.06.07 | Film, Nation building, Minorities, Aarhus University

Drawing the German-Danish border: posters and propaganda from 1920

Go with Klaus Tolstrup Petersen, historian and director of the Schleswig Collection (Danish Central Library for South Schleswig), back to 1920 when a plebiscite was held on whether the area of northern and middle Schleswig would be Danish or German. Take a look at the many posters and propaganda that were used to try to sway voters in this film in…

Linguistically hybrid logo for a German sports club in Aabenraa, Denmark.

2019.05.06 | Article, Peter Thaler, Minorities, Multiculturalism

The German Minority in Southern Denmark

The historical duchy of Schleswig was divided following two plebiscites in 1920. Ever since, South Schleswig has formed the northern section of the German federal state of Schleswig-Holstein, whereas North Schleswig forms the Danish border region of South Jutland. National minorities were left behind on both sides of the border. Thus, a minority…

For decades, Abus Salam Madsen's 1967-translation of The Quran was the only Danish version of the book. Pictured above is the front cover to Ellen Wulff's translation which was originally published in 2006. Picture: Vandkunsten.

2019.04.29 | Article, Jørgen Bæk Simonsen, Belief systems, Multiculturalism

Islam in Denmark – an historical overview

Despite the public debate since 1980s presenting Islam in Denmark as a new phenomenon, it has for centuries played a central role as ‘the other’ when Danes have sought to explain their collective identity. It is true that many Danish Muslims arrived as a ‘guest workers’ in the boom years of the 1960s and stayed on. They were followed by their…

A view of the skyline of the Danish capital Copenhagen which gave its name to the Copenhagen Declaration negotiated during Denmark's presidency of the Council of Europe in 2017/2018. Photo: Alessandro Bellone, Unsplash.

2019.04.26 | Article, Nicola Witcombe, Law, Minorities, Aarhus University

The European Convention on Human Rights: Copenhagen Declaration 2018

The Copenhagen Declaration 2018 is a non-binding road map for the Council of Europe with respect to the European Convention on Human Rights. It was agreed by the 47 members of the Council of Europe during Denmark’s chairmanship of the Committee of Ministers from November 2017 to May 2018. The Danish government’s position was to push for greater…

The official flag of Åland since the 1950s. Åland is semi-automonous in that it has its own legislature, but it is a part of Finland despite over 90% of the population speaking Swedish. Photo: Wikimedia Commons, Public Domain.

2019.04.25 | The Quick Read, Jason Lavery, Minorities, Governance

The Åland Islands

The Åland Islands lie at the south-western tip of the Finnish peninsula between Finland and Sweden. This archipelago of 6,500 islands and skerries is demilitarised, an autonomous region and a Swedish-speaking part of Finland.

Housing block in Rinkeby, Sweden, 2009. Photo: Holger Ellgaard (CC BY-SA 3.0)

2019.04.04 | The Quick Read, Dorota Lubińska, Multiculturalism

Urban vernacular in Sweden

Rinkebysvenska or Rinkeby Swedish is a contemporary urban vernacular (CUV) which has developed in multi-ethnic urban areas of Sweden including a suburb of Stockholm called Rinkeby. This speech variety is mainly used by young people in addition to other languages and language varieties depending on context, and its use is reflected in rap and…

There has been an increase in Danish churches opening their doors to non-Danes and non-Christians generally and specifically through intercultural activities. Photo: Brian Dreyer, Colourbox.

2019.03.29 | Article, Laura Bjørg Serup Petersen, Belief systems, Multiculturalism, Research, Aarhus University

Intercultural encounters in the Danish church in 2010s

The church as a social caretaker became less common throughout the 20th century as the Nordic welfare state increasingly took over this task. Churches which engage in social activities are arguably reclaiming this role, such as the increasing number of churches in the Danish People’s Church engaging in intercultural activities. These local…

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