Byron Zachary Rom-Jensen

Byron Rom-Jensen is a postdoctoral researcher at Aarhus University, Denmark. His areas of study include transnational and international political history, with a focus on the relationships and transfers between the Nordic countries and North America. You can read more about Byron by clicking here.


Contributions to nordics.info

2020.07.17 | Video, Byron Zachary Rom-Jensen, Region-building, Nation building, Public policy

Film: The Nordic Model: A Complex Concept

The Nordic Model’ is a concept that appears frequently in scholarship, media reports, and public debates to refer to the socio-political organization and progressive values of the Nordic countries. While the concept has been applied since at least the 1980s, it lacks a standard definition and thus is open to variation and alteration. The term has…

Södertörn University just outside Stockholm, where the podcasts were recorded at the Institute of Contemporary History.

2020.04.15 | Podcast, Andreas Mørkved Hellenes, Byron Zachary Rom-Jensen, Carl Marklund, The Nordic Model, Nation building

Podcast: The Nordic Model: Heaven or Hell?

Since the interwar years, foreign observers have regularly portrayed the Nordic countries as well functioning states, successful in solving crises, with happy populations; in short as good societies. Why did this happen? Are the Nordic countries the way they are simply because they are in a relatively safe corner of the world? Because they have…

In the 1960s, commentators suggested the behavior of Scandinavian mothers, such as dominating child-rearing and going out to work, influenced their offspring's mental health and led to higher suicide rates. Photo: Les Anderson, Unsplash.

2019.11.28 | Outlook, Byron Zachary Rom-Jensen, Reputation, Culture, Research

‘Socialist’ suicide in Scandinavia: a historical view of a common myth

High rates of suicide are often connected with the Nordic countries and their apparently ‘socialist’ policies. Highlighting high suicide rates in Scandinavia can be traced back to at least the 1960s when foreign observers attempted to either undermine or legitimize the welfare states in Denmark, Norway and Sweden. These characterizations forced…